The Lower Rhine And South Sleswick: Two Border Regions And Their Relation To Their Neighbours And Minorities

A comparative essay and assessment why under similar circumstances there is a very active ethnic minority representation in South Sleswick consisting of Danes and Frisians while there is nothing comparable in the Lower Rhine area representing the Dutch speaking minority although Dutch was the official language there until 1815.

  1. Introduction

1.1. Objectives

1.2. Limitations and Weaknesses

1.3. Terminology and Language of the Essay

Link to 1. Introduction

  1. Nationalism

2.1. The term “German / Deutsch / Dutch”, Page 11

Link to 2. Nationalism

  1. South Sleswick and the Lower Rhine, where is that?

3.1. The Lower Rhine – Another attempt to describe a region, Page 1

3.2. The languages of the Lower Rhine, Page 2

3.3. Sleswick – another attempt to describe a region, Page 11

Link to 3. South Sleswick and the Lower Rhine, where is that

  1. The History of Sleswick until 1789

4.1. Danish place-names south of the Eider and in Eastern Holsten, Page 5

Link to 4. The History of Sleswick until 1789

  1. Sleswick from 1789 until 1945

5.1. The Sleswick-Holsten movement and the Danish movement in Sleswick

5.1.1. From 1789 until 1863, Page 2

5.1.2. From 1863 until 1918, Page 9

5.1.3. From 1918 until 1945, Page 15

5.2. German nationalism and its domination of the Sleswick-Holsten movement in the 19th century, Page 19

5.3. The Frisian Movement, Page 25

5.4. Low Saxon / Low German movements, Page 28

5.5. Klaus Groth and Theodor Storm – Two Sleswick-Holsten contemporaries of the period between Lornsen’s pamphlet and the Prussian annexation, Page 31

Link to 5. Sleswick from 1789 until 1945

  1. The state of Sleswick-Holsten from 1945 until 2013

6.1. The Danish movement from 1945 until 2013, Page 5

6.2. Conclusion, Page 13

Link to 6. The state of Sleswick-Holsten from 1945 until 2013

  1. The History of the Lower Rhine and Limburg (Dutch/Belgian province) until 1789

Link to 7. History of the Lower Rhine and Limburg until 1789

  1. The Lower Rhine and Limburg from 1789 until 1945

8.1. The French revolution, the Napoleonic Wars and the incorporation of the Lower Rhine and Limburg into the German Federation, the Kingdom of the Netherlands and Belgium, Page 1

8.2. The European Uprising of 1848, Page 9

8.3. The Austro-Prussian, the French-Prussian war and the establishment of the German Empire in 1871 and the end of Limburg’s membership in the German Federation

8.3.1. The Establishment of the German Empire in 1871, Page 12

8.3.2. Bismarck, Page 13

8.3.3. 1890 – 1918, Page 15

8.4. The transfer of Eupen – Malmedy from the German Empire to Belgium after WWI, Page 17

8.5. The Separatist and Autonomous movements in the Rhineland after WW I. until the establishment of North Rhine – Westphalia, Page 19

8.6. Reasons for the failure and disputes concerning the Rhenish separatist and autonomous movements, Page 27

8.7. Election results in detail, Page 30

8.8. Conclusion, Page 31

Link to 8. The Lower Rhine and Limburg from 1789 until 1945

  1. The provinces of Limburg and the establishment of the state of North Rhine – Westphalia after 1945

9.1. Konrad Adenauer’s role, Page 5

Link to 9. Limburg and The establishment of the state of North Rhine – Westphalia after 1945

  1. Germanic – North Sea Germanic – Low Dutch – Frisian – Low Saxon – Low Franconian

10.1. Low Saxon, Page 2

10.2. Frisian, Page 7

10.2.1. Frisian in North Friesland, Page 9

10.3. Lower Franconian – Dutch, Page 11

10.3.1. Dutch in Belgium – “Flemish”, Page 16

10.3.2. Dutch at the Lower Rhine, Page 18

10.4. Danish in South Sleswick, Page 23

Link to 10. Germanic – North Sea Germanic – Low Dutch – Frisian – Low Saxon – Low Franconian – Danish

  1. Summary

11.1. Is there a case for an official status for Dutch and Lower Franconian at the Lower Rhine in accordance to the ERMTS part III and/or part II?, Page 3

11.2. Final thoughts, Page 6

Link to 11. Summary

Works Cited and Bibliography

Link to Works Cited

© Helge Tietz 2014

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s